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  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Kavanaugh Fight Binds Trump and His Party

    While the Kavanaugh fight has divided the country, it has had almost the opposite effect in one place: It has bound together President Trump and the Republican Party as never before, writes Gerald F. Seib.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • How Much Politics in a Supreme Court Justice?

    In the past, a political background was considered fine for a Supreme Court justice nominee. Today it is seen as a problem. But both parties actually want predictable judges, not impartial ones, writes Gerald F. Seib.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Memories of 2006 Fuel Democrats’ Midterm Hopes

    The similarities between now and 2006--the last time Democrats took control of the House and Senate in the midterm elections--are almost eerie, but with one exception, Gerald F. Seib writes.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Michael Cohen Deals a Blow to His Former Boss

    With his guilty plea, Michael Cohen undercut the belief that if the president could show there was no collusion between his campaign and Russian operatives in 2016, his legal problems would crumble, writes Gerald F. Seib.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • A Clampdown Slowing Legal, Not Just Illegal, Immigration

    The Trump administration is taking myriad steps to reduce legal immigration, in addition to its very public campaign to stop illegal immigration. Some of these quieter steps are being made through new policies or a stricter interpretation of existing regulations.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • A Team Comfortable With Letting Trump Be Trump

    The most important people around President Trump these days are four top advisers who come from quite different backgrounds, but have one thing in common: They are contemporaries of the 72-year-old president.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • The Trump Divide Grows Wider

    From the moment he rode down the escalator at his eponymous Fifth Avenue skyscraper to announce his candidacy three years ago, President Donald Trump has divided Americans. But the Trump Divide is growing wider and deeper.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • If Faith in Democracy Ebbs, Danger Rises

    Important as civility is, something even more important appears to be imperiled in today’s charged political climate: faith in democracy itself, Gerald F. Seib writes.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Is America Retreating Into Uni-solationism?

    A longtime French diplomat sees in the recent U.S. foreign-policy decisions “a strange mix of unilateralism and isolationism.” That spells trouble, he says—for America’s relations with its allies, and even, potentially, for peace in the world, Gerald F. Seib writes.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • The Risky Calculus of the Trump-Kim Embrace

    Midway through the press conference after his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, President Trump offered his basic argument for why this effort at diplomacy with Pyongyang will succeed where so many others have failed: “This is a much different time, and this is a much different president.”

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal
  • For Trump, the Challenges From China Multiply

    The most important international problem facing the Trump administration isn’t North Korea or Iran, but the way the challenges posed by China are multiplying on just about every front, Gerald F. Seib writes.

    Capital Journal News | Wall Street Journal

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